FAQ

  • FAQ
  • How Thermoses (Vacuum Flasks) Work?

    Most people have or are familiar with the “Thermos” (also known as a vacuum flask or a dewar). I can remember as a kid having one that came with my lunch box. One day my mother might put grape juice in it and at lunch I would have nice, cold grape juice. The next day she would put hot soup in it and I would have hot soup for lunch. And I can remember asking, “How does it know whether to keep stuff hot or cold?” Where’s the switch, in other words…

    Or, similarly, “You heat things up in an oven and cool them down in a refrigerator — how come this thing can do both?” In this edition ofHowStuffWorks, we will learn how a Thermos “knows” what to do.

    Let’s say you take a glass of ice water or a bowl of hot soup and let them sit out on the kitchen table. You know what will happen: The bowl of soup will cool down to room temperature, and the glass of ice water will warm up to room temperature. This is a thermodynamic fact of life — if you put any two objects with different temperatures together, thenheat transfer will cause them to reach the same temperature. So a “room” and a “hot bowl of soup” reach the same temperature by the heat transfer process — the room gets slightly warmer and the bowl of soup gets a lot colder.

    If you want to keep a bowl of soup hot as long as possible — that is, if you want to slow down the natural heat transfer process as much as you can — you have to slow down the three processes that cause heat transfer. The processes are:

    • Conduction – Let’s start with a simple question: What is heat? Heat is atomic motion. An atom represents its “heat” by its speed. At the temperature absolute zero, there is no atomic motion. But as atoms get warmer they move. Heat is transferred when one atom runs into another. When this happens, it is a little bit like billiard balls colliding — the second atom picks up some of the motion of the first atom. Heat is transferred by these collisions.

    The best example of this phenomenon would be to take a metal bar and heat one end of it. The other end will get warm and then hot through conduction. When you put a metal pan on the stove, the inside of the pan gets hot through conduction of the heat through the metal in the bottom of the pan. Some materials (namely metals) are better heat conductors than others (for example, plastics).

    • Radiation – Another side effect of atomic motion is vibration, and vibration leads to the unexpected phenomenon of infrared radiation. According to the Encyclopedia Britannica, “Infrared radiation is absorbed and emitted by the rotations and vibrations of chemically bonded atoms or groups of atoms and thus by many kinds of materials.” Infrared radiation is a form of light.

    Our eyes are unable to see infrared, but our skin can feel it. About half of all of the sun’s energy that reaches us comes as invisible infrared radiation, with the rest of it visible to us as light. Infrared, like visible light, is reflected by mirrors and absorbed better by black objects. When infrared is absorbed, it results in atomic motion, and therefore, in a rise in temperature. Some common examples of infrared are the heat you feel radiating from an electric heater or a red-hot piece of metal, the heat you feel radiating from the bricks in a fireplace even if the fire has gone out and the heat you feel radiating from a concrete wall after the sun has gone down.

    • Convection – Convection is a property of liquids and gases. It occurs because when a liquid or gas gets hot, it tends to rise above the rest of the body of liquid or gas. So, if you have a hot bowl of soup on the table, it heats a layer of air surrounding the bowl. That layer then rises because it is hotter than the surrounding air. Cold air fills in the space left by the rising hot air. This new cold air then heats up and rises, and the cycle repeats. It is possible to speed up convection — that is why you blow on hot soup to cool it down. If it weren’t for convection your soup would stay hot a lot longer, because it turns out that air is a pretty poor heat conductor.

    You can see all three of these heat transfer processes occurring when you stand next to a bonfire:

    You probably need to stand at least 20 feet away from a big bonfire like this one. What keeps you away is heat radiating from the fire through infrared radiation. The flames and smoke are carried upward byconvection: Air around the fire heats up and rises. The ground 3 feet beneath the fire will get hot, heated byconduction. The top layer of soil is directly heated (by radiation), and then the heat is conducted through layers of dirt deep into the ground.

    To build a good thermos, what you want to do is reduce these three heat transfer phenomena as much as possible.

    How Thermoses (Vacuum Flasks) Work

     

    Inner Workings of a Thermos

    One way to build a thermos-like container would be to take a jar and wrap it in, for example, foam insulation. Insulation works by two principles. First, the plastic in the foam is not a very good heat conductor. Second, the airtrapped in the foam is an even worse heat conductor. So conduction has been reduced. Because the air is broken into tiny bubbles, the other thing foam insulation does is largely eliminate convection inside the foam. Heat transfer through foam is therefore pretty small.

    It turns out that there is an even better insulator than foam: a vacuum. A vacuum is a lack of atoms. A “perfect vacuum” contains zero atoms. It is nearly impossible to create a perfect vacuum, but you can get close. Without atoms you eliminate conduction and convection completely.

    What you find in a thermos is a glass envelope holding a vacuum. Inside a thermos is glass, and around the glass is a vacuum. The glass envelope is fragile, so it is encased in a plastic or metal case. In many thermoses you can actually unscrew and remove this glass envelope.

    A thermos then goes one step further. The glass is silvered (like a mirror) to reduce infrared radiation. The combination of a vacuum and the silvering greatly reduces heat transfer by convection, conduction and radiation.

    So why do hot things in a thermos ever cool down? You can see in the figure two paths for heat transfer. The big one is the cap. The other one is the glass, which provides a conduction path at the top of the flask where the inner and outer walls meet. Although heat transfer through these paths is small, it is not zero.

    Does the thermos know whether the fluid inside it is hot or cold? No. All the thermos is doing is limiting heat transfer through the walls of the thermos. That lets the fluid inside the thermos keep its temperature nearly constant for a long period of time (whether the temperature is hot or cold).

    Experiments to Try

    If you are the experimental sort, you might want to try some experiments to see how different forms of insulation compare to a thermos. Or you might want to try to improve the performance of a thermos. “Can you keep hot coffee hot all day?” is the ultimate question: If you can answer this question affirmatively it is likely you could base an entire business empire around it…

    One avenue of investigation involves understanding your thermos better:

    1. Start with a thermos.
    2. Fill it with boiling water and cap it.
    3. Measure its temperature with a thermometer every hour or two and see what the temperature graph looks like.

    If you put the thermos inside a small foam cooler, does that change anything? What if you store the thermos upside down during the day — what effect, if any, does that have?

    Another thing you can try is a set of experiments to find the insulation values of different materials. Find several jars that hold the same amount of liquid as your thermos and try insulating them in different materials. Try things you have around the house like foam, wool, aluminum foil, plastic, newspaper, etc. Also try combinations of these materials, and different thicknesses. You will learn a lot about the heat conductivity of different materials!

     

    The Biggest Thermos

    One question often asked at this point is, “If a vacuum is such a good insulator, then how do you cool a spacecraft?” Heat builds up in a spacecraft from its electronics, its fuel cells, its rocket engines and incoming solar radiation, among other things. All of this heat needs to go somewhere or the spacecraft will overheat. However, the spacecraft is floating in the world’s biggest thermos — the vacuum of outer space. So how does a spacecraft dump its excess heat?

    It turns out that heat dissipation is a fairly significant part of the spacecraft design process. For example, if you look at this pageyou will see that Skylab had a gold coating to reject infrared radiation coming from the sun, and a large radiator to dissipate heat that built up. A space radiator can use nothing but infrared heat radiation to dissipate heat, so it must be much larger than a similar radiator on Earth, where convection plays a big part in the cooling process (almost all radiators on Earth use fans to improve the effects of convection). Similarly, the inside of the space shuttle’s cargo bay doors are lined with radiators. Once the shuttle is in orbit, one of the first things the crew does is open these doors so that heat can radiate away, as this page explains.

    So if space is a giant vacuum and a vacuum is an insulator, why do astronauts get cold fingers on space walks? The cold-finger problem is actually quite interesting. This article discusses some of the reasons.

  • Eastman Tritan™ A new generation copolyester

    Eastman Tritan™ copolyester What’s happening?
    Launched publicly on Oct 24, 2007 (K'07)
    Produced in Kingsport, TN
    Initially focused on target markets in North America and Europe
       Housewares
       Small appliances
       Infant care
       Signs sheet applications
    Significant focus on injection molding applications
    Partnering with key extrusion customers
    Eastman Tritan™ copolyester balances the properties of easy processing, clarity, toughness, and heat and chemical resistance – creating compelling value.
    Very tough (NB notched izod)
    High Tg (110°C-120°C)
    Chemically resistant
    Hydrolytically stable
    Low residual stress
    Bisphenol-A free
    Easy to mold in PC operations
    Lower density vs PC
    Good clarity and high gloss
    Good scratch resistance
    NEW polymer
  • Are plastic water bottles safe to use?

    Are plastic water bottles safe to use?

    In a word: Yes. New research shows that plasticizers—the chemicals used to make plastics strong yet pliable—aren’t as big a health risk as people have made them out to be. The biggest concern has involved endocrine disruptors. Bisphenol A (BPA) is probably the most widely known of these, and many manufacturers have stopped using it in products for children. However, other plasticizers are likely to pose more risk than BPA. A large-scale risk assessment conducted by the European Food Safety Authority (which has much stricter standards than the US Food and Drug Administration) found that BPA poses virtually no threat—even to young children.

    As for other plasticizers, the research is inconclusive on which ones cause harm and by how much. Leaching can occur with some types of plasticizers, but it involves very small amounts and can take years. According to Neal Langerman, principal scientist and owner of the consulting firm Advanced Chemical Safety, it’s when companies perform accelerated-aging studies on such materials, subjecting the plastic to the equivalent of five to six years’ worth of use, that a small amount of additives leach into liquid stored in the plastic. Langerman said that this is a much smaller amount than would do harm, according to the available data.

    BPS, aka bisphenol S, is a compound that some companies use instead of BPA, such as in BPA-free water bottles. The Tritan plastic brand, made by Eastman Chemical and used in our large-capacity plastic bottle pick, is one of these compounds. You may have heard some mutterings about Tritan, because of a 2012 lawsuit. Outside research says that the same health effects that researchers see in lab animals with BPA are present for BPS and BPF (bisphenol F, another alternative), as well. But as mentioned above, BPA is fine at the doses people are exposed to. It stands to reason based on this latest research that BPS and BPF are also safe, but only time will tell.

    Sources: http://thewirecutter.com/reviews/best-water-bottle/

  • What is a sippy cup?

    What is a sippy cup?

    sippy cup

    A sippy cup is a training cup – usually plastic – with a screw- or snap-on lid and a spout that lets your child drink without spilling. You can get models with or without handles and choose ones with different types of spouts.

    Sippy cups can be a great way for your baby to transition from nursing or bottle-feeding to a regular cup. They can also improve hand-to-mouth coordination. When your baby has the motor skills to handle a cup but not the skills to keep the drink from spilling, a sippy cup can give him some independence while keeping cleanup to a minimum.

  • When should I introduce a sippy cup?

    When should I introduce a sippy cup?

    sippy cup

    Encourage your child to use a training cup whenever you think she's ready. Some babies enjoy using a sippy cup as early as 6 months, and others aren't interested until after their first birthday.

    To prevent tooth decay, the American Dental Association recommends transitioning from a bottle to a training cup by your child's first birthday.

  • What's the best way to transition to a sippy cup?

    What's the best way to transition to a sippy cup?

    sippy cup

    Some babies take to a sippy cup immediately, and some take a while to get used to the idea. (Some may never use one.) Here are some tips for introducing the sippy cup:

    • Start off with one that has a soft, pliable spout because this feels more familiar to your baby than a hard plastic spout.
    • Show your baby how to raise the cup to his mouth and tip it up to drink. Show him that the spout is like a nipple by touching the tip of the spout to the roof of his mouth to stimulate the sucking reflex.
    • Give it some time. Until your baby masters the technique, you may want to put only water in the cup to avoid too many messes. And don't worry if your baby doesn't take to the sippy cup right away. Just wait a few weeks and try again.
    • Shop around. There are all kinds of sippy cups, with all kinds of spouts. Sippy cups aren't too expensive, so it's worth letting your baby test-drive several if one isn't working. Try different models until you find one that suits your baby.
  • What should I do if my child refuses the sippy cup?

    What should I do if my child refuses the sippy cup?

    sippy cup

    Babies have all kinds of reasons for rejecting sippy cups. And of course, there's no law saying she ever has to use one. Some babies go straight to a regular cup from the breast or bottle. But if you want your baby to use a sippy cup, try these tactics that other parents have used successfully:

    • Dip the spout into breast milk or formula before giving it to your baby. Another approach is to put a bottle nipple (without the bottle) in her mouth and after she starts sucking, replace it with the sippy spout. Some parents have even had success simply substituting the sippy cup for the bottle.
    • Switch halfway through a feeding. If she drinks from a bottle, give her half of her formula or breast milk in the bottle. When it's empty, switch to the sippy cup for the second half of the feeding. (Continue to hold her as you do when she's bottle-feeding.)
    • Modify the sippy spout. Some cups have valves that are so effective at keeping the liquid from spilling that it's a lot of work to drink from it. If your baby sucks on the sippy spout but doesn't get anything, try taking out the valve that controls the flow (if the sippy cup has one of these and it's removable).
    • Work in reverse order. Teach your baby to drink from the sippy without the lid on it first. Put just a teaspoon or two of liquid in at a time and help her raise the cup to her mouth. After she gets the hang of that and understands that there's liquid inside the cup, put the lid on (without the valve, if there is one). Finally, put the valve in and let her take over.
    • Offer your baby a straw. Some cups come with a built-in straw, and some babies find these easier to use than a spout. If your baby does get the hang of sucking from a straw, she may then be better able to handle sucking from the spout.
    • Try other beverages. Some babies will drink water or juice – but not breast milk or formula – from a sippy cup. (But don't give juice to a baby 6 months or younger, and limit juice for older babies and toddlers to no more than 4 ounces a day.)
    • Show your baby how it's done. Get a clean sippy and let your baby see you drink from it. Or have a sibling drink from a sippy in front of the baby. Sometimes making a little sucking noise is all it takes to inspire a baby to start sucking. Just be sure to give your baby a clean sippy cup. Sharing a cup with your baby can increase the amount of tooth-decaying bacteria in her saliva.
  • What not to do for sippy cup

    What not to do for sippy cup?

    sippy cup

    Using a sippy cup may seem like a piece of cake, but there are some pitfalls you'll want to avoid:

    • Never let your child take a sippy cup of juice or milk to bed. The sugars can pool in his mouth and cause tooth decay. The same goes for walking around with one in hand for hours on end. One idea is to limit juice and milk to meals and snack time, and refill his sippy cup with water when he's thirsty.
    • Clean the cup thoroughly (especially the lid and plastic stopper) between uses. Liquid can easily become trapped in the nooks and crannies of a sippy cup and valve, leading to the growth of bacteria and mold.
      If you can't wash a sippy cup right away, at least give it a good rinse. If that's not possible, drain any remaining liquid and take it apart. Periodically check your lids and valves for damage or mold.
    • Don't expect the sippy cup to be the magic answer to weaning. For some babies, it simply replaces the bottle and presents another weaning challenge.
      Still, many parents find it more acceptable to see their growing child with a sippy than a bottle in hand. And if used properly, a sippy cup can be less damaging to your baby's teeth than a bottle.
    • Don't use the sippy cup for too long. As soon as your child can handle it, switch to a regular cup. Most toddlers can manage a two-handled open cup by the time they're 2 years old.
  • What and how much should I give my baby each day in her sippy cup?

    What and how much should I give my baby each day in her sippy cup?

    sippy cup

    If your baby is younger than 6 months old, simply give her a portion of her breast milk or formula in the sippy cup each day.

    Generally, water and juice are unnecessary for breastfed and bottle-fed infants in the first six months of life. (And don't give your baby cow's milk until she's at least a year old.)

    After six months, if your baby's thirsty between feedings, refill her sippy with water.

    Babies 6 months and older can be given up to 4 ounces of 100 percent fruit juice a day in addition to formula or breast milk. (But don't give it at bedtime to prevent tooth decay.)

    Once your child starts drinking whole milk (at age 1), experts recommend giving her no more than 32 ounces of milk and a half cup of juice per day. Otherwise your toddler may be more likely to get cavities and be too full to eat at mealtime.

     

  • Are there safety concerns I should be aware of sippy cup?

    Are there safety concerns I should be aware of sippy cup?

    sippy cup

    Plastics in baby bottles used to be made with the chemical bisphenol A (BPA), but this has been banned since 2012. (And many manufacturers had already stopped using BPA before that because of public concerns over exposing children to this chemical.)

    Just to be safe, don't let your child drink from a plastic cup or bottle that is scratched or damaged. A worn cup with scratches is more likely to harbor bacteria and may leach chemicals.

    But any plastic can leach chemicals. Two recent studies even found that some BPA-free cups leach even higher amounts of synthetic hormones than those made with BPA. If you're worried about plastic, consider using steel or glass cups.

  • Use And Care:Plastic Hydration Bottles

    Use And Care:Plastic Hydration Bottles

    plastic-water-bottles

    • Wash and rinse the product thoroughly before first use and after each use. Hand washing is recommended for best results. This product is dishwasher safe and placing it on the top rack is recommended.
    • DO NOT use bleach or cleaners containing chlorine on any parts of the product.

    CAUTION

    • BE CARE OF USING WITH HOT LIQUIDS.
    • Hot liquids may cause burns.
    • Dairy or other liquids that spoil easily should not be kept in product for prolonged periods.
    • Not intended for carbonated beverages as carbonation places product under pressure and may cause product to leak.
    • DO NOT microwave.
  • Care And Use: Stainless steel vacuum jugs

    Care and Use: Stainless Steel Vacuu jug

    [caption id="attachment_1071" align="alignnone" width="300"]stainless travel vacuum bottles stainless travel vacuum bottles[/caption]

    By taking care of this item, you can expect years of dependable service. Please read the information presented below to get the most out of your new Thermos product.

    • Wash and rinse the product thoroughly before first use and after each use. Hand washing is recommended for best results.
    • DO NOT use abrasive cleansers or scrubbers since they may dull the finish.
    • DO NOT use bleach or cleaners containing chlorine on any parts of the product.
    • For maximum insulation efficiency, preheat or prechill product just prior to use. Fill with hot/cold tap water, attach lid, let stand 5 to 10 minutes and empty. After filling, place the lid on the product to increase thermal efficiency.
    • DO NOT place product in the dishwasher to clean. Product is not dishwasher safe (except stainless steel bottle and can insulators).
    • Beverage bottle insulator fabric top must be removed for cleaning. Do not place in dishwasher. Clean fabric top with a damp cloth.

    To operate the twist and pour stopper on beverage bottles:

    1. Twist the stopper clockwise to seal.
    2. Twist the stopper counterclockwise 1/2 -1 turn so that the pour indicator is pointing down. Pour beverage. Note: The stopper does not need to be removed to pour liquid. Twist the stopper clockwise to reseal.
    3. Twist the stopper counterclockwise to remove.

    To operate the 360° drinkable lid on tumbler models:

    1. Twist drink lid clockwise to seal.
    2. Twist drink lid counterclockwise 1/2 - 1 turn to the drink position. Liquid can now be dispensed from any direction. Twist the drink lid clockwise to reseal.
    3. Twist drink lid counterclockwise to remove.

    To operate the push button sipper lid on the hydration bottle:

    1. Rotate the stainless steel locking ring down.
    2. Push the button on the sipper lid to open the top. Drink or pour beverage.
    3. To close, push the top down until it snaps in place.
    4. To secure the top, rotate the stainless steel locking ring up until it snaps in place.

    CAUTION

    • DO NOT microwave.
    • DO NOT overfill product. Hot foods or liquids can scald user.
    • Keep out of reach of children when product contains hot liquids.
    • DO NOT overfill product. Hot liquids can scald user.
    • Dairy or other liquids that spoil easily should not be kept in product for prolonged periods.
    • The Hydration bottles are intended for use with cold liquids only. Hot liquids can scald user.
    • DO NOT drink hot liquids directly from a steel vacuum bottle or from the stopper. Hot liquids may scald user.
  • Care and Use: Filtered Hydration Bottles

    Care and Use: Filtered Hydration Bottles

    HOW TO CARE FOR YOUR FILTER AND BOTTLE

    • Please see the illustrations on the following pages for instructions on how to disassemble your bottle and its components for washing.
    • Before first use, and as soon as possible after each use, wash all parts, except filter, with warm, soapy water. Rinse all parts thoroughly with cool water and allow to dry.
    • The bottle and lid parts are top rack dishwasher safe; however, hand washing is recommended as the dishwasher uses harsher detergents and hot water that may affect the appearance of your bottle.
    • DO NOT use bleach or cleaners containing chlorine on any parts of the product.
    • DO NOT wash filter in the dishwasher. If you accidently wash your filter in the dishwasher, please discard and replace with a new filter.
    • DO NOT wash filter with soap. To clean filter, rinse with cool water only.
    • To reassemble your bottle after washing, follow the disassembly instructions in reverse order.
    • For optimum performance, it is recommended to leave the filter in the drink tube assembly until it is time to replace the filter.

    HOW TO USE YOUR FILTER AND BOTTLE

    • Before first use and to get optimum results from your new filtration bottle, insert filter into drink tube assembly and submerge the entire filter in cold water for 1 hour. Remove filter from water and rinse with cold running water for 3 minutes to wash off any loose carbon particles on the filter. Insert drink tube assembly with filter into bottle and fill bottle with water. Let water pass through the filter and discard this water.
    • After this procedure is completed, fill the bottle up to fill line with potable water, screw lid back on, and enjoy your new Thermos Filtration Bottle.
    • DO NOT fill the bottle through the drink tube – water MUST be filled to the outside of the drink tube.
    • Bottle lid MUST be open for the water to pass through the filter – the filter will not work when the lid is closed (see illustration).
    • Filter should be replaced after every 20 gallons (128 full bottles) of use – filter replacement is important for the product to perform as represented. Replacement filters generally retail.

    STEP 1

    To remove lid unscrew counter-clockwise. Remove all packaging inside the bottle.

    STEP 2

    Pull drink tube assembly up to remove from bottle.

    DRINK TUBE ASSEMBLY

    STEP 3

    Remove both gaskets from drink tube assembly by pulling off as shown inillustration.

    STEP 4

    Twist filter counter-clockwise and align filter tabs with slots on filter body to remove.

    STEP 5

    Pull filter up to remove from drink tube

    • Rinse filter with cool water only.
    • DO NOT wash with soap.
    • DO NOT wash in dishwasher.
    • Before first use submerge filter in cold tap water for a minimum of 30 minutes – proper pre-soaking will improve the initial filter flow rate.

    Wash all parts shown below with warm, soapy water. All parts shown below are dishwasher safe (top rack only), but for prolonged life of the product hand washing is recommended.

    TO ENSURE PROPER PERFORMANCE OF YOUR PRODUCT, FOLLOW THE SPECIAL INSTRUCTIONS BELOW WHEN REASSEMBLING YOUR FILTRATION BOTTLE.

    When replacing the drink tube assembly gaskets, make sure they are in place and properly seated as shown in the illustration.

    When replacing drink tube assembly back inside the bottle, make sure to press the drink tube assembly down until it stops at the 3 ribs inside the bottom of the bottle as shown in illustration.

    Fill bottle with water and let the water pass through the filter and into the lower reservoir under the filter until the lower reservoir is full. Once the lower reservoir is full, proceed to fill up the bottle to the fill line shown in the illustration.

    Once the bottle has been filled to the fill line, replace the lid by screwing it clockwise until it comes to a stop.

    NOTE

    LID CAP MUST BE IN OPEN POSITION, AS SHOWN IN THE ILLUSTRATION, IN ORDER FOR UNFILTERED WATER TO FLOW THROUGH THE FILTER AND INTO THE BOTTOM RESERVOIR. WATER WILL NOT FLOW THROUGH THE FILTER WHILE THE LID CAP IS CLOSED.

    CAUTION

    • Filter is intended to be used with potable water only. If you plan to use the bottle for beverages other than potable water, remove and store the filter in a plastic bag placed in the refrigerator. If the filter is not used for a period of 5 days, discard the filter.
    • Dairy or other liquids that spoil easily should not be kept in product for prolonged periods.
    • Not intended for carbonated beverages as carbonation places product under pressure and may cause product to leak.
    • NOT FOR USE WITH HOT LIQUIDS.
    • For cold liquids only. Hot liquids may cause burns or damage filter.
    • Operating temperature: Min. 35 F/2 C – Max 85 F/29 C
    • DO NOT microwave the bottle or filter.
    • DO NOT freeze the bottle or filter.

    IMPORTANT

    • The contaminants or other substances reduced by the Filtration Bottle system may not be found in all users’ water. Filter replacement is essential for product to perform as represented. Please follow all recommended guidelines for filter replacement.
    • The Filtration Bottle is not intended to purify water. Do not use with water that is microbiologically unsafe or of unknown quality without adequate disinfection before or after the system. Please consult your local water provider for actual water quality or if you have a well, have your water tested by a qualified water testing laboratory.
    • For use with potable water only.
    • Bottle Lid must be open for the water to pass through the filter – the filter will not work when the lid is closed.
  • Care and Use: Straw Water Bottle

    Care and Use: Straw Water Bottle

    [caption id="attachment_1029" align="alignnone" width="300"]stainless vacuum straw bottle stainless vacuum straw bottle[/caption]

    To Clean Before first use, and as soon as possible after each use, wash all parts with warm, soapy water. Rinse thoroughly and allow to dry.

    To Use

    To operate the hygienic push button drink lid:

    1. Push the button on the sipper lid to open the top.
    2. Drink from the sipper straw.
    3. To close, push the lid down until it snaps into place
    • This product is leak-proof only when the lid is in the closed and locked position.
    • A worn sipper straw may cause the product to leak. Check straw regularly and replace immediately if damaged or worn.
    • Replacement straws are available by calling Thermos at 1-800-831-9242.

    Straw may be removed for cleaning or replacement as follows:

    1. Unscrew lid.
    2. Push the button on the sipper lid to open the top.
    3. Using your thumbs, push the sipper straw assembly through the bottom of the lid.
    4. Pull the inner straw from the bottom of the plastic support disk.
    5. Remove rubber straw disk from plastic support disk.

    To assemble:

    1. Wrap rubber sipper straw edges around the plastic support disk.
    2. Push the straw onto plastic support disk. Guide sipper straw assembly into hole in lid. Push firmly into place using inner straw.
    3. Fill sippy cup with cold liquid. Securely tighten lid before giving to child.
    4. For maximum thermal efficiency, prechill straw bottle prior to use. Fill with cold tap water, attach lid, let stand
    5. 5 to 10 minutes and empty.

    CAUTION

    • For cold liquids only. Hot liquids may cause burns.
    • Always test temperature of liquid before feeding to your child.
    • Dairy or other liquids that spoil easily should not be kept in product for prolonged periods.
    • To avoid possible injury, DO NOT let child walk or run with product.
    • To avoid possible injury, DO NOT let child chew on the soft material of the straw as it may present a choking hazard.
    • Check straw regularly for tears and replace immediately if damaged or worn.
    • Not intended for carbonated beverages as carbonation places product under pressure and may cause product to leak.
    • Never leave child unattended while using this product.
    • Continuous and prolonged sucking of fluids such as fruit juices or flavored sugary drinks may cause tooth decay.

     

  • Care and Use: Kids Sippy Cup

    Care and Use: Kids Sippy Cup

    kids sippy cups

    Before first use, and as soon as possible after each use, wash all parts with warm, soapy water. Rinse thoroughly and allow to dry.

    • DO NOT use abrasive cleansers or scrubbers as they may dull the finish.
    • DO NOT use bleaches or cleaners containing chlorine.
    • All parts are top rack dishwasher safe; however, hand washing is recommended for best results.

    To Use

    • Assemble valve, by firmly placing the valve plate into the bottom of the valve.
    • Firmly place assembled valve into the bottom of the soft spout.
    • Firmly place assembled soft spout into the bottom of the lid.
    • Fill sippy cup with cold liquid.
    • Securely tighten lid before giving to child

    Thermos Sippy Cup Lid Drawing

    CAUTION

    • For cold liquids only. Hot liquids may cause burns.
    • Always test temperature of liquid before feeding to your child.
    • Dairy or other liquids that spoil easily should not be kept in product for prolonged periods.
    • To avoid possible injury, do not let child walk or run with product.
    • To avoid possible injury, do not let child chew or teethe on the soft material of the spout as it may present a choking hazard.
    • Check spout and valve regularly for tears and replace immediately if damaged or worn.
    • Not intended for carbonated beverages as carbonation places product under pressure and may cause product to leak.
    • Never leave child unattended while using this product.
    • Continuous and prolonged sucking of fluids such as fruit juices or flavored sugary drinks may cause tooth decay.
  • Care and Use: Food Jar

    Care and Use: Food Jar

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    Before first use, and as soon as possible after each use, wash all parts with warm, soapy water. Rinse thoroughly and allow to dry.

    All parts are top rack dishwasher safe; however, hand washing is recommended for best results.

    For maximum thermal efficiency, preheat or prechill food jar prior to use. Fill with hot/cold ap water, attach lid, let stand 5 to 10 minutes and empty.

    • DO NOT use abrasive cleansers or scrubbers as they may dull the finish.
    • DO NOT use bleaches or cleaners containing chlorine.

    CAUTION

    • Use only with adult supervision when product contains hot foods or liquids. Hot foods or liquids can scald user.
    • DO NOT overfill product. Hot foods or liquids can scald user.
    • DO NOT use product in microwave, on stove top, or any type of oven.
    • Always test temperature of liquid before feeding to your child.
    • Dairy or other liquids that spoil easily should not be kept in product for prolonged periods.
    • To avoid possible injury, do not let child walk or run with product.
    • Never leave child unattended while using this product.
  • How to Clean a Stainless Steel Water Bottle

    How to Clean a Stainless Steel Water Bottle

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    Stainless steel water bottles are becoming more common. These bottles are more durable than plastic water bottles and they are easier to keep clean. Plastic bottles sometimes impart an unpleasant scent and flavor to liquids. While this flavor and scent can also occur in improperly cleaned stainless steel bottles, it is easier to remove. If you use a few common household products after each use, you can keep your stainless steel water bottle clean, fresh and odor free.

    Things You'll Need

    • Water
    • White vinegar
    • Bottle brush
    • Towel
    • Clean cloth
    • Remove the bottle's cap and set it aside. Pour 2 tbsp. white vinegar into the bottle. Replace the cap and shake the bottle. This spreads the vinegar over the interior surface.
    • Take the cap off again and, leaving the vinegar inside, add warm water until the bottle is 1/2 full. Push a bottle brush through the mouth of the bottle. Gentle scrub the interior surfaces with the brush. Next, take the brush out and replace the cap. Shake the bottle again vigorously, and then pour the contents out.
    • Rinse the inside of the bottle, and then place a small amount (1 tsp. or less) of vinegar on a soft cloth. Wipe down the outside of the bottle with vinegar; then, rinse under water.
    • Wash the cap with a clean, vinegar-soaked cloth. If the cap smelled musty before you began cleaning, let the vinegar remain on the cap for up to 15 minutes; otherwise, rinse it off after 1 to 2 minutes.

    Tips & Warnings

    • If juice, milk or other liquids (besides water) have been stored in the bottle for a while (long enough to get moldy or crusty), it may need cleaning with regular dish soap to loosen dried-on particles, followed by a vinegar cleaning.
    • Look for bottle brushes in the baby supplies section or household cleaning supplies section of your local supermarket.
    • Avoid a musty smell by emptying the bottle and cleaning it after each use. Always let it dry with the cap off.
    • You can use baking soda as a substitute for vinegar.